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About the Program

Do financial markets matter for aggregate productivity?  Why do similar (sometimes identical) goods have different prices across stores?  How do financial frictions amplify recessions?  What is the impact of innovation shocks on asset prices and the economy? What does an aging and slow growing population do to your economy?  What drives CEO pay and wealth inequality?  Why are there gender and racial wage gaps?  How does international trade affect the environment?  In the aftermath of the 2008 financial and economic crisis, academics and policymakers are paying closer attention to how the market works, and money markets and financial frictions in business cycles extending into the macroeconomic and financial landscape.  The study of Economics considers broad ranging real world issues such as these.

The Department of Economics at Columbia University is ranked among the top institutions for research in economics in the world, and as an undergraduate student you will have the opportunity to engage with faculty and explore research across a range of policy areas encompassing fiscal, economic and financial policies.  The goal of the economics program is to train students to think analytically about social issues, and as such provide a solid foundation for further study and careers in economics as well as for multiple other pursuits.

The single best resource for getting accurate and timely information about the economics major is the department’s own website.  This website will direct you to the sources of the specific information that you need to make the most of your experience here at Columbia as an economics student.

Major

The Undergraduate Department of Economics has 6 majors and one concentration. The majors are:

  • Economics
  • Financial Economics
  • Joint with Math
  • Joint with Philosophy
  • Joint with Political Science
  • Joint with Statistics

The economics major at Columbia University takes a scientific approach to the study of micro and macroeconomic theory.  In this program students learn how to conduct formal modelling of economic relationships, test hypotheses against data, and think critically about economic problems and policy issues.  To make sure that you are making good progress towards your degree in economics, download and fill out a checklist for your major from the department website.  You should do so prior to the April registration period.  The checklist will alert you to any problems that you will need to bring to the attention of the economics department.  If you have any questions or concerns about your major requirements, then you should come into the department and speak with econ-advising

As a declared major, you will receive on occasion important information about the department, courses offered, opportunities for undergraduates and events that we think may be of interest to our majors.  Note that we do not send out information very often, so that when you do receive an email from the department, please take a moment to read it.  Information that we consider less urgent to bring to your attention, will be posted on the department’s Econ Info for Students page.

Columbia College students, please read the CC Bulletin

General Studies students, please read the GS Bulletin

1022 International Affairs Building (IAB)
Mail Code 3308  
420 West 118th Street
New York, NY 10027
Ph: (212) 854-3680
Fax: (212) 854-0749
Business Hours:
Mon–Fri, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

1022 International Affairs Building (IAB)

Mail Code 3308

420 West 118th Street

New York, NY 10027

Ph: (212) 854-3680
Fax: (212) 854-0749
Business Hours:
Mon–Fri, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.