FAQ ●  Resources ● Giving
Select Page


Senior Seminars Description


FALL 2019

Economics Senior Seminar Description

Seminars listed below are only open to CC and GS undergraduate economics majors.

PLEASE NOTE: ALL PREREQUISITES (ECON UN3211, UN3213, UN3412) must be successfully completed before the seminar may be taken—not after and not concurrently, otherwise the seminar will not count towards the major. Check the CC/GS bulletin for all seminar prerequisites and details.

DAYS, TIMES and CLASSROOMS can be found on the Registrar’s DIRECTORY of CLASSES website:

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/

GU4911 (Sec. 1) Seminar in MICROECONOMIC Theory
Instructor: Dr. Sunil Gulati
Topic: Sports Economics
This seminar will focus on an economic analysis of the sports industry.  Topics covered will include economics of sports leagues, the labor market for professional athletes, sports marketing and broadcasting, economic impact of teams & stadiums and antitrust policies. A number of guest speakers from the sports world (including the professional leagues and media industry) will be featured. One textbook and a number of separate readings will be assigned. Seminar students are expected to actively participate in class discussions, make an in class presentation of selected readings and of original work and write a term paper on an agreed upon topic.

GU4911 (Sec. 2) 
Instructor: Dr. Neal Masia
Topic:  Public Policy, Economics and the Healthcare Industry
This seminar satisfies the seminar requirement for the financial economics major.
The healthcare industry accounts for nearly 20% of GDP in the United States. This seminar will explore the links between major public policy events – for instance, healthcare reform or recent Medicare and Medicaid changes – and the financial prospects and implications for various healthcare industry sectors. Lectures will examine how current and potential public policy decisions impact the bottom line and the behavior of key industry sectors including pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, doctors, insurance companies, nursing homes, and others. Each student will conduct research on an industry sector and a live public policy or regulatory issue of their choosing. Students will be expected to use their quantitative and analytic toolkit to evaluate how a key government policy (or potential policy within the health reform context) is likely to affect the industry’s fortunes and behavior going forward, with implications for consumers, investors, and future policymakers.

GU4911 (Sec. 3) 
Instructor: Prof Lena Edlund
Topic:  Gender Economics
This seminar will take a critical look at the institutions governing family formation over time and across cultures. We will discuss their social and economic origins as well as consequences. Sample questions include: Why were married women’s property rights expanded in 19th Century America? Why has so many of the economic development success stories come out of East Asia? Why do women work more and men less, and what are some of the consequences. Active class room participation and a term paper required. (Rev. 3/2019).

GU4911 (Sec. 4)
Instructor: Prof Tri Vi Dang
Topic: Private Equity & Hedge Fund Investing
This seminar is only open to Financial-Economics majors, and satisfies the seminar requirement for the financial economics major.
This seminar course discusses the economics of professional asset management with special focus on private equity and hedge fund investing. The aim of this seminar is to provide the students with the analytical skills and conceptual frameworks necessary to significantly deepen their understanding of asset management. The first part of the course examines how private equity funds and hedge funds as the two most prominent alternative investment vehicles are raised and structured. The second part of the seminar discusses the deal making of private equity managers as well as various investment strategies of hedge fund managers.

GU4911 (sec. 5)
Instructor: Prof Prajit Dutta
Topic: Economics of the Arts
This seminar satisfies the seminar requirement for the financial economics major.
The seminar will survey the art market. Readings will include exploration of the business model and common practices of for-profit art galleries and the primary and secondary markets for art sales. Art appraisals, auctions, art collectors and art as investment will be discussed in detail. Students will be required to attend an art auction.

GU4911 (sec. 6)
Instructor: Prof Guillaume Haeringer
Topic: Cryptocurrencies and the Economics of Blockchain  
This seminar satisfies the seminar requirement for the financial economics major.
Ten years after its inception Bitcoin became a household name, periodically making the headlines of newspapers, blogs and other media. As of today, there are more than a thousand cryptocurrencies competing with each other and that could potentially disrupt monetary policies. The technology behind Bitcoin, the so-called blockchain, has also triggered a staggering number of potential applications for other purposes than managing a payment system. The objective of this course is to provide a clear and concise understanding of Bitcoin’s design, highlighting its strengths and weaknesses. The course will also consider recent developments around cryptocurrencies and non-currency applications of the blockchain technology. Emphasis will be made around the economic aspects of cryptocurrencies, distributed ledger technology, and smart contracts. The course will consist of examining recent research that uses tools from Game Theory and Industrial Organization (although no specific knowledge is needed, students who are already acquainted with these areas are encouraged to enroll).

*************************************************************************

GU4913 Seminar in MACROECONOMIC Theory (Sec. 1)
Instructor: Prof Matthieu Gomez
Topic: Causes and Consequences of Inequality
This seminar satisfies the seminar requirement for the financial economics major.
This seminar will discuss the economic causes and consequences of inequality, with a particular focus on top income and wealth inequality. We will discuss the relative role of technology, financial markets, and institutions in driving the recent rise in inequality. Seminar students are expected to actively participate in class discussions, make an in class presentation of selected readings and of original work and write a term paper on an agreed upon topic.

GU4913 (Sec. 2)
Instructor: Prof Jennifer La’O
Topic: Financial Intermediation in the Macroeconomy
This seminar satisfies the seminar requirement for the financial economics major.
Financial institutions are a pillar of the modern economy. Banks form a crucial link between borrowers and savers, channeling funds towards productive ventures, while managing economic risks and liquidity. This seminar strives to offer students an understanding of the theory of financial intermediation and banking, and the role financial institutions play in the macroeconomy. We will in particular study the topics of liquidity and financial fragility, and in addition examine historical periods of financial crises.

GU4913 (sec. 3)
Instructor: Dr. Maxim Pinkovskiy
Topic: Empirical Economics of Institutions and Development
This seminar satisfies the seminar requirement for the financial economics major.
Why are some countries rich and others poor? We will review the modern literature on the fundamental causes of cross-country growth differences in the long run – geography, culture and institutions — with a particular emphasis on how institutions affect development. Sample topics will include the impacts of property rights on development, the interrelationship between democratization and development, and the persistence of indirect impacts of institutions that no longer exist. The crucial advance of this literature has been to rigorously identify causal estimates of the effects of institutions on developmental outcomes by exploiting “natural experiments in history” to hold confounding factors fixed. We will look at many such natural experiments, drawing examples from the dawn of humanity to the 2010s, and from the developed and developing world. We will also study the modern econometric methods in establishing causal links between variables that these papers rely upon to convert these natural experiments into estimates. In particular, we will discuss the method of instrumental variables, differences-in-differences techniques and advanced panel data analysis, as well as regression discontinuity design. A goal of the seminar will be to broaden students’ horizons on what inferences can be drawn from data (and what kinds of data to look for) in preparation for the seminar paper.

*************************************************************************

GU4918 Seminar in ECONOMETRICS
NOT OFFERED in Fall 2019


*************************************************************************

GU4921 POLITICAL ECONOMY Seminar
NOT OFFERED in Fall 2019.

GU4950 ECONOMICS-PHILOSOPHY Seminar
NOT OFFERED in Fall 2019.

 

1022 International Affairs Building (IAB)
Mail Code 3308  
420 West 118th Street
New York, NY 10027
Ph: (212) 854-3680
Fax: (212) 854-0749
Business Hours:
Mon–Fri, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

1022 International Affairs Building (IAB)

Mail Code 3308

420 West 118th Street

New York, NY 10027

Ph: (212) 854-3680
Fax: (212) 854-0749
Business Hours:
Mon–Fri, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.