Kenneth J. Arrow Series Book Launch

November 17, 2014 - 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Location: 
Columbia University Faculty House New York, NY 10027
United States
See video
 
 
 
Book Launch for the Kenneth J. Arrow Lecture Series
 
With a panel discussion featuring Kenneth J. Arrow, Scott Barrett, Patrick Bolton, Bruce Greenwald, Geo rey 
Heal, Eric Maskin, Paul Milgrom, Bernard Salanié, José A. Scheinkman, Jay Sethuraman and Joseph E. Stiglitz, 
moderated by Jan Svengar.
 
Featuring a welcome by David Madigan, Executive Vice President and Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Columbia University, and a dedication to William Vickrey by Ronald Findlay.
 
 
Speaker Biographies
 
Kenneth Arrow is the Joan Kenney Professor of Economics and Professor of Operations Research, emeritus at Stanford University. He is a Nobel Prize-winning economist whose work has been primarily in economic theory and operations, focusing on areas including social choice theory, risk bearing, medical economics, general equilibrium analysis, inventory theory, and the economics of information and innovation. He was one of the first economists to note the existence of a learning curve, and he also showed that under certain conditions an economy reaches a general equilibrium. In 1972, together with Sir John Hicks, he won the Nobel Prize in economics, for his pioneering contributions to general equilibrium theory and welfare theory. Professor Arrow has served on the economics faculties of the University of Chicago, Harvard and Stanford. In addition to the Nobel Prize, he has received the American Economic Association's John Bates Clark Medal. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. He received a BS from City College, an MA and PhD from Columbia University, and holds approximately 20 honorary degrees.
 
 
Scott Barrett is a leading scholar on transnational and global challenges, ranging from climate change to disease eradication. His research focuses on how institutions like norms, customary law, resolutions, and treaties can be used to promote international cooperation. He has advised a number of international organizations, including the United Nations, the World Bank, the OECD, the European Commission, and the International Task Force on Global Public Goods. He was previously a lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and a member of the Academic Panel to the Department of Environment in the UK. Barrett previously taught at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, DC, where he also directed the International Policy program. Before that, he was on the faculty of the London Business School. He has also been a visiting scholar at Yale. Barrett is a research fellow with the Beijer Institute (Stockholm), CESifo (Munich), and the Kiel Institute of World Economics.
 
 
Patrick Bolton is the David Zalaznick Professor of Business. He joined Columbia Business School in July 2005. He received his PhD from the London School of Economics in 1986 and holds a BA in economics from the University of Cambridge and a BA in political science from the Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris. He began his career as an assistant professor at the University of California at Berkeley and then moved to Harvard University, joining their economics department from 1987- 1989. He was Chargé de Recherche at the C.N.R.S. Laboratoire d’ Econométrie de L’ Ecole Polytechnique from 1989-1991, Cassel Professor of Money and Banking at the London School of Economics from 1991-1994, Chargé de cours associé at the Institut d'Etudes Europénnes de l'Université Libre de Bruxelles from 1994-1998, and John H. Scully ’66 Professor of Finance and Economics at Princeton University from 1998-2005. His research and areas of interest are in contract theory and contracting issues in corporate finance and industrial organizationHe recently published his first book, Contract Theory, with Mathias Dewatripont and has co-edited a second book with Howard Rosenthal, Credit Markets for the Poor.
 
 
Bruce C. Greenwald holds the Robert Heilbrunn Professorship of Finance and Asset Management at Columbia Business School and is the academic Director of the Heilbrunn Center for Graham & Dodd Investing. Described by the New York Times as "a guru to Wall Street's gurus," Greenwald is an authority on value investing with additional expertise in productivity and the economics of information. Greenwald has been recognized for his outstanding teaching abilities. He has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Columbia University Presidential Teaching Award which honors the best of Columbia's teachers for maintaining the University's longstanding reputation for educational excellence. His classes are consistently oversubscribed, with more than 650 students taking his courses every year in subjects such as Value Investing, Economics of Strategic Behavior, Globalization of Markets, and Strategic Management of Media.
 
 
Geoffrey Heal is Donald C. Waite III Professor of Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School, is noted for contributions to economic theory and resource and environmental economics. He holds bachelors (first class), masters and doctoral degrees from Cambridge University, where he studied at Churchill College and taught at Christ’s College. He holds an Honorary Doctorate from the Universite' de Paris Dauphine. Author of eighteen books and about two hundred articles, Professor Heal is a Fellow of the Econometric Society, Past President of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, recipient of its prize for publications of enduring quality and a Life Fellow, a Director of the Union of Concerned Scientists and a founder and Director of the Coalition for Rainforest Nations, developers of the REDD policy for reducing deforestation by awarding carbon credits for forest conservation. Professor Heal chaired a committee of the National Academy of Sciences on valuing ecosystem services, was a Commissioner of the Pew Oceans Commission, is a coordinating lead author of the IPCC, was a member of President Sarkozy''s Commission on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress, was a member of the advisory board for the World Bank's 2010 World Development Report and the United Nations Environment Program’ 2011 Human Development Report, and acts as an advisor to the World Bank on its Green Growth project. He teaches MBA courses on "Current Developments in Energy Markets," "Business and Society: Doing Well by Doing Good?", and "The Business of Sustainability."
 
 
Eric Maskin is Adams University Professor at Harvard University. He received the 2007 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics (with L. Hurwicz and R. Myerson) for laying the foundations of mechanism design theory. He also has made contributions to game theory, contract theory, social choice theory and other areas of economics such as the theory of income inequality, the study of intellectual property rights, and political economy. He received his A.B. and Ph.D from Harvard and was a postdoctoral fellow at Jesus College, Cambridge University. He was a faculty member at MIT from 1977-1984, Harvard from 1985-2000, and the Institute for Advanced Study from 2000-2011. He rejoined the Harvard faculty in 2012.
 
 
Bernard Salanié is Professor of Economics at Columbia University and the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris. He previously taught at Stanford, Chicago University and the ENSAE. He is co-editor of the journal Economic Studies. He was elected Fellow of the Econometric Society in 2001. His academic interests focus on Contracts and Organization, Econometrics, Labor Economics, Microeconomics, Public Economics.
 
 
José A. Scheinkman is the Edwin W. Rickert Professor of Economics at Columbia University, Theodore A. Wells ‘29 Professor of Economics (emeritus) at Princeton University and a Research Associate at the NBER. Previously, Scheinkman was the Alvin H. Baum Distinguished Service Professor and Chairman of the Department of Economics at the University of Chicago, Blaise Pascal Research Professor (France), Visiting Professor at Collège de France, Vice President in the Financial Strategies Group of Goldman, Sachs & Co. and co-editor of the Journal of Political Economy. He has served as a consultant to several financial institutions and serves on the board of Cosan Limited, a NYSE listed company engaged in the production and distribution of sugar, ethanol and energy in Brazil. Scheinkman is a Member of the National Academy of Sciences, Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Fellow of the Econometric Society, Corresponding Member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences, and received a “docteur honoris causa” from the Université Paris-Dauphine. In 2007 he was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. Scheinkman’s current research focuses on bubbles in financial markets and the determinants of the size of the financial industry.
 
 
Joseph E. Stiglitz is University Professor, founder and Co-president of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue, and Faculty Associate at the Center on Global Economic Governance, at Columbia University. He also served as the Chair of the Commission of Experts on Reforms of the International Monetary and Financial System, appointed by the President of the General Assembly of the United Nations, in 2009. He earned his PhD from MIT in 1967, became a full professor at Yale in 1970, and in 1979 was awarded the John Bates Clark Award, given biennially by the American Economic Association to the economist under 40 who has made the most significant contribution to the field. Professor Stiglitz was a member of the Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) from 1993-95, during the Clinton administration, and served as CEA chairman from 1995-97. He then became Chief Economist and Senior Vice-President of the World Bank from 1997-2000. In 2001, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics for his analyses of markets with asymmetric information, and he was also a lead author of the 1995 Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.
 
 
Jan Svejnar is the James T. Shotwell Professor of Global Political Economy and Founding Director of the Center on Global Economic Governance at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA). His research focuses on the effects of foreign investment and government policies on firms and workers; corporate, national and global governance and performance; and entrepreneurship. He has published widely in academic, policy and practitioner-oriented journals in advanced and emerging economies. Prior to joining Columbia, Professor Svejnar taught at the University of Michigan, University of Pittsburgh, and Cornell. He received his BS from Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations and his MA and PhD in Economics from Princeton University. In 2012, he was honored with a Neuron Prize for lifelong achievement from the Karel Janeček Endowment for Research and Science. In 2008, Professor Svejnar was one of two candidates for the Presidency of the Czech Republic.
 
Jay Sethuraman joined Columbia University's Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Department in 1999. His research interests are in the areas of scheduling, discrete optimization and its applications, and applied probability. He is currently the Director of the PHD program for Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Department
 
In connection with the Arrow Series Book Launch, please join us on Tuesday, November 18, for the 7th Arrow Lecture.